Sporting hats: The headwear of Olympians
Media & Cultural Studies

Sporting hats: The headwear of Olympians

In the stifling summer heat of 1948, the crowds watching the opening ceremony for the London Games at Wembley erupted in jubilation at the sight of the British team, who marched into the stadium adorned by the humble beret. Biddle-Perry’s article explores the British Olympic Association’s (BOA) adoption of the Kangol beret for both male and female athletes at the London Games of 1948 and the great significance of this small item of clothing. Continue reading

Engaging with reality
Film Studies

Engaging with reality

It is a daunting thought that globalization influences almost every aspect of our daily lives; from the food we eat to the media we watch to the way we communicate with one another. Unless you are happy enough to be marooned on a desert island or isolated on a remote mountain retreat there is no way to avoid it, and although global institutions appear weak at times, they are incredibly important in the way the world and all its workings perpetuates. Continue reading

Tattoos of Honolulu
Visual Arts

Tattoos of Honolulu

‘Although tattoos were once employed primarily to indicate one’s affiliation with a group, they are now more frequently adopted as individualized statements of personal identity’ (Negrin 2008). Dress scholar Llewellyn Negrin (2008) argues that tattoos in the West began to be seen on other types of people (e.g. women, gay men, middle class) in the 1970s who used tribal motifs from traditional cultures such as those found in the Pacific, including Hawai`i. Continue reading